Tag Archives: sin

Abounding Grace

I make no secret of the fact that I have some serious troubles with sin. I’m sure, if we are honest, that we all can see so many ways in which we “fall short of the glory of God”. We live in a fallen world, and we ourselves have the nature of fallen man within us (the flesh, or sinful nature), and of course the devil is keen to tempt and accuse us when he can.

Yet if we are believers in the crucified and risen Christ then we have access to the Father through the Spirit, we have forgiveness of sin, we have a new nature, one “not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.” (John 1:13). We are born again, and are by nature creatures of mercy, not wrath.

I need to make an important point before I continue with the main thrust of this post: we should never take God’s grace as a light matter, or as an excuse to indulge in sin. Paul says:

“What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin that grace may abound? Certainly not! How shall we who died to sin live any longer in it? Or do you not know that as many of us as were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into His death? Therefore we were buried with Him through baptism into death, that just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.” – Romans 6:1-4

We should certainly not take the sacrifice of Christ as a license to sin. Many have spoken of what is known as “cheap grace” – the concept of forgiveness without a repentant heart. That is not the Way. The Way of Jesus is to “Repent! For the kingdom of God is near!”

Yet we all do fall into sinful behaviour. Some of these are one-offs and we can return to Christ and the Father and confess and repent of our sins, and know we have learnt our lesson. Some sins, however, are habitual, and we find ourselves falling in that one area or those few areas again and again. Sometimes these habitual sins can really get us down.

I want to encourage you! However hard you fall, however many times you fall, God is faithful. If you are His then “no-one is able to snatch [you] out of [the] Father’s hands.” – John 10:29.

God’s grace is quite astounding. It truly is an amazing grace. His grace abounds towards us, and abounds toward us more and more. Yes, even if we are trapped in a habitual sin God’s grace is sufficient, and He will grant victory at some point and we must co-operate with that deliverance. We must have a repentant attitude: we must be constantly turning away from the sinful inclinations and turn to God and draw on His strength. His grace abounds, He does forgive, and He will grant us His deliverance as we, seemingly again and again, have to turn to Him for restoration after a fall.

Do not lose heart! Remember: God’s grace is abounding toward you!

“For a righteous man may fall seven times And rise again, But the wicked shall fall by calamity.” – Proverbs 24:16

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God Loves Mercy – Thoughts on Hurricane Sandy

Many bloggers and many prominent Christians have spoken on the question of whether natural disasters are the result of God’s judgement against nations and against people. I have felt prompted today to write my own prayerful thoughts following the terrible events from Hurricane Sandy in the US.

Firstly I am praying that I may be sensitive to the fact that some have lost their lives, both in the US and previously in Haiti and other Caribbean islands. Many more have lost possessions, homes and livelihoods. My heart goes out to those affected and my prayers have been and will continue to be with you.

We should be very careful when writing on such a subject that we present God and His nature truthfully. I would be lying if I denied that God is a God that loves justice. I would also be lying if I said that God is never moved to wrath. Yet we should be clear that the primary and all-consuming nature of God is Love. God the Father sent Jesus to save His people from their sins, and if you have, or would, receive Jesus and make Him your Lord and Saviour then you can be assured of mercy.

The Psalmist once spends every other line of a Psalm declaring “His mercy endures forever”.

So does God send natural disasters as a punishment for wickedness? In some instances I believe He does, but I shall qualify that by saying that God takes no pleasure in the death of a sinner and that God does not will that any should perish but that all should come to repentance.

God, if and when He is moved to wrath, is not like a mortal man who is in a rage and conceives murder in his heart, but rather makes His power known in order that, perhaps, the people may be brought to turn from wickedness and embrace the fullness of joy that is freely available in Jesus. God does not send trials and disasters as mere punishment, but uses them as a means to bring many to a close relationship with Himself.

A passage which I am not the first to point to tells when Jesus was confronted by some Jews who were advocating that very attitude too many preachers seem to take: that disasters happen because of the victims’ sins.

There were present at that season some who told Him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices.
2 And Jesus answered and said to them, “Do you suppose that these Galileans were worse sinners than all other Galileans, because they suffered such things?
3 “I tell you, no; but unless you repent you will all likewise perish.
4 “Or those eighteen on whom the tower in Sī-lōam fell and killed them, do you think that they were worse sinners than all other men who dwelt in Jerusalem?
5 “I tell you, no; but unless you repent you will all likewise perish.”

Luke 13:1-5

Here it is clear – those affected by disasters of whatever sort are no more deserving of that fate than us all. We cannot point the finger and say “Your sins are to blame.” If we even approach this attitude it must be such that “Our sins are to blame.” We have inherited the curse of sin through Adam, and this has been passed on to every person, you and I included, and part of that curse is the curse upon the earth – hence natural disasters.

It is only through Jesus that we may be saved from that sin and eternal wrath, and the disasters that strike us are not formed in the mind of God to punish us, but are allowed by God and used by God to bring us into closer union with Him and may accomplish the real desire of God which is eternal, intimate relationship with you and I.

And note how God loves to show mercy in the verses following Luke 13:5:

He also spoke this parable: “A certain man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard, and he came seeking fruit on it and found none.
7 “Then he said to the keeper of his vineyard, ‘Look, for three years I have come seeking fruit on this fig tree and find none. Cut it down; why does it use up the ground?’
8 “But he answered and said to him, ‘Sir, let it alone this year also, until I dig around it and fertilize it.
9 ‘And if it bears fruit, well. But if not, after that you can cut it down.’ ”

– Luke 13:6-9

I believe that this passage shows how merciful God is, as the planter is representative of God and the servant representative of God the Son, Jesus, Who pleads with God to spare the fig-tree, representing us, until He has nourished it and built it up. It is here we see that though God is just and must punish sin yet God the Son pleads on our behalf and God the Father shows mercy and puts off the just punishment in order that we may be nourished and fed.

In summary, God is sometimes moved to wrath, yet it is always His first desire to show mercy, and even wrath is used to this end. Natural disasters are the result of a world under sin and the wrath of the devil, but even through these God works things together for good. Our proper response to such disasters is not to point out other people’s sins, but to look at our own sin and repent of it and to show mercy to those who are afflicted.

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Sin and Repentance

Prayer

If we fall into sin, our response must be to come to God and confess

I have had reason today to spend time in prayer confessing and repenting from certain sins.

There is a danger when we sin of reacting in two ways: either we can treat it as a light thing, something that doesn’t really matter, or we can be so consumed by our wrongdoing that we feel condemned and unable to approach God. Both responses are in grave error.

Firstly, we must remember that Jesus died for our sins. It wasn’t a “cheap” or unimportant death – He did not die a painless and sorrowless death – He suffered enormously. Our sin is a great and heavy burden – it should never be regarded as something that “does not matter because Jesus dealt with it”. Yet in that death Jesus did pay the full price for our sin and our sins. We have a God that does not condemn but rather loves to show mercy.

We should never feel that our sins are too great to prevent us from approaching the throne of grace. Remember that one of the greatest tools of the enemy the devil is to make us ineffective as Christians through making us feel condemned and unable to approach God. Jesus is our Advocate. In the ongoing courtroom of justice, the devil is the accuser, yet Jesus pleads His Blood and by such we are forgiven and assured of salvation if we have trusted in Him.

So how do we experience in the here and now that very precious gift of forgiveness? We must come before God, confess our sins and turn from them and to Him (repentance). It doesn’t matter how many times we need to do this. My own battles with sins have lasted many years and I do fall into the trap sometimes of thinking that all hope of deliverance from those sins is gone. Yet even if a particular stronghold has gone on for many years we can place our hope and trust in our Redeemer, and indeed we must.

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The Offence of the Cross

I have been prompted to make this entry in my blog because of the debate about Christianity and homosexuality.  Note that this was the prompt, but I am not going to focus on gay issues as my main point in this post.

There is a difficult, and at times un-Christianly bitter, debate within the Church between those who stand on Biblical principles in moral behaviour and those who suggest that the grace of God and the requirement to love all means that all or any behaviour is acceptable, providing it conforms to the World’s standards of morality.

For example, the liberals would say that a homosexual priest is fine, but a serial murderer priest is not.  The Bible, in fact, and in the New Testament, classes both sins as equal.  The liberals dispute this.

Yet to move beyond the homosexual debate is, I believe, important.  The conflict over gay rights is currently to the fore, prompted by moves in the UK to prohibit Christian principles in the workplace and by moves in the US ordaining openly homosexual bishops.  But the charge is now often brought that the Church is obsessed with “gay bashing”.  Although the debate wasn’t started by conservative Christians, we have risen to the bait and it seems that much campaigning has been focused on this.

But it is important, I believe, to move the debate forward.  The UK, and the world, are being swamped by sinful behaviours, and they are not exclusively to do with sexual behaviour.

My own particular struggle,  with drink and drugs, needs to be brought to attention.  I would take the same approach to heavy drinkers and drug users as I would to homosexual practice, for the Bible treats them as equal sins.  Show love, offer help, but do not shy away from saying such behaviour is sinful.  I have a deep sorrow at my past drink and drug use, and now I would not thank those who said “never mind, roll around on the floor dribbling, God doesn’t mind”.  The truth is: God does mind, He calls it sin.

There are other issues too, such as the oppression and exploitation of the poor.  The degree to which this happens in the UK, from the human trafficking to the exploitation by clothes shops in using overseas sweatshops, is appalling.  Christians need to speak on these issues.

I want to say one more thing: there has been a growing move in the UK to make Church “fashionable”.  To make Jesus attractive.  Sometimes this borders on attempting to con people into becoming Christians.  It is done in the name of “making Church relevant”.  Yet, the Bible is clear that we should “speak the truth”.  We cannot accept the “fluffy God” or the “it’s okay Jesus”.  God, Jesus, is Holy.

We must be clear.  A refusal to obey God will result in judgement.  But God is so loving that He gave His only Son, Jesus Christ, that whosoever should believe on Him should not perish but have everlasting life.

If we Christians truly live, breathe, and then speak the Truth, believe me we shall soon find, and rejoice in, the fact that Jesus Christ and His Cross are most offensive to those who refuse to believe.

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